Student Guide

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Unit 1 - Escape Room

Lesson 1 - Functions

  • Placing . after a function lists its subcommands: Terminal.WriteLine()

  • Text variables or messages go into “”. Terminal.WriteLine(“Hello, World!”);

  • Each line ends with a ;

  • Functions take () ---inside the () you can put in variables/arguments/messages to pass

Lesson 2 - Functions

  • Functions should start with void Function()

  • The things that functions do go inside { }:

void FunctionName()

{

the things function does;

}


Lesson 3 - Variables

  • Variables

  • Types: int string bool float

  • Structure: (scope) type name (= value;)

int door;

public int door;

public int door = 1;

  • Once declared, you can call the functions in place of values that you would normally type in. For example:

move.Forward(50); can be rewritten:

int speed = 50;

move.Forward(speed);


Lesson 4 - Functions w/ Arguments

  • Functions with Arguments: MoveUp (int speed)

  • If a function accepts arguments, it needs to receive it when they are first called. For example, if you call this function from void Update:


void Update()

{

MoveUp(5);

}


void MoveUp(int speed)

{

go.Up(speed);

}



Lesson 5 - C# operators


Lesson 6 - Conditionals

  • If statement

if (condition == “something”)

{

The thing that you want to do;

}

  • If & else statement:

if (condition == “something”)

{

The thing that you want to do;

}

else

{

The other thing you want to do;

}

  • If & else if statement

if (condition == “something”)

{

The thing that you want to do;

}

else if (condition == “something”) //you can add more else ifs

{

The other thing you want to do;

}

else

{

The thing you want to if nothing else is true;

}


Lesson 8 - Booleans

  • Logical operators are also called boolean operators. They operate with truth(boolean) values and the result is always a truth value (true or false). These operators are useful if you want to combine several conditions into a single statement.

  • Since we want a boolean variable available from all script functions, we need a global(member) bool:

public bool main; // (it is assumed to be false if not assigned true)

  • With this bool, you can switch it on or off and do different things based on its condition.

If (main == true)

{

Do A

}

else

{

Do B

}




Lesson 9 - Refactoring

  • As we keep adding new functionality and code, our code gets long. It becomes something coders refer to as: Spaghetti Code:

  • We refactor code so that we can easily follow our code. Each Function does only one thing, and we can easily change functionality in our game by editing that specific function, instead of hunting it down.


Lesson 11 - Arrays

  • To declare an array, define the variable type with square brackets:

string[] cars = {"Volvo", "BMW", "Ford", "Mazda"};

int[] myNum = {10, 20, 30, 40};

  • Note: Array indexes start with 0: [0] is the first element. [1] is the second element, etc.

string[] cars = {"Volvo", "BMW", "Ford", "Mazda"};

Console.WriteLine(cars[0]);

// Outputs Volvo


Lesson 12 - Random

  • We can add randomness by using Random

  • password = door1Passwords[Random.Range(0, door1Passwords.Length)];

    • Starts from item 0

    • arrayName.Length means the number of the last item

    • Random.Range() picks one number from the range.


Lesson 13 - Adding multiple lines into Terminal.WriteLine

  • Use @"

Terminal.WriteLine(@”Line 1 here

Line 2 here”);




Lesson 14 - Password.Anagram()

  • This is function provided inside our asset only

void StartGame(string input)

{

Terminal.WriteLine("You have chosen door " + door);

Terminal.WriteLine("Please enter your password: " + password.Anagram());

pass = true;

if (input == password)

{

Terminal.WriteLine (“WELL DONE!!);

DisplayWinScreen();

}

else

{

Terminal.WriteLine (“Sorry, wrong password!”);

}

}

Unit 2 - Escape Room